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Friday, October 5
 

3:30pm

Campus Tour
Join us for a tour of new spaces related to digital scholarship.  Stops may include:  Digital Scholarship Studio, GIS Underground, One-button Studio, and Hildreth-Mirza Hall - home of Bucknell's Humanities Center.

Speakers
avatar for Matthew Gardzina

Matthew Gardzina

Director, Digital Pedagogy & Scholarship, Director, Digital Pedagogy & Scholarship, Bucknell University
Matt is responsible for providing leadership, direction, planning, and oversight for the wide-range of outreach, consultation, instruction and support programs of the Digital Pedagogy & Scholarship team. A native of the Berkshires in Western Massachusetts, Matt came to Bucknell from... Read More →


Friday October 5, 2018 3:30pm - 5:00pm
Bertrand Library Lobby

3:30pm

Registration
Registration will take place on the 2nd floor of the Elaine Langone Center (ELC) on the uphill side of the building. Please follow signs to registration posted in the ELC.

Friday October 5, 2018 3:30pm - 6:30pm
Elaine Langone Center Hallway

5:00pm

Opening Reception
Friday October 5, 2018 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Weis Center Atrium Lobby

6:15pm

Dinner and Keynote Address
Kelley specializes in nineteenth-century U.S. and Latin American literary studies, Latinx studies, digital humanities, and comparative media studies  as an Assistant Professor of English at Pace University. In her research and teaching, she explores the role of media change past and present in enabling and inspiring shifts in the way we tell stories about current affairs. Kelley is also the co-founder and co-director of Babble Lab, a digital humanities center at Pace that seeks to reimagine how we teach the humanities through the use of data, design, and code and through the study of the new media of the present and the past. She is currently completing a book called Electrifying News: A Hemispheric History of the Present in Nineteenth-Century Print Culture.


Speakers
KK

Kelley Kreitz

Keynote Speaker BUDSC18
Kelley specializes in nineteenth-century U.S. and Latin American literary studies, Latinx studies, digital humanities, and comparative media studies  as an Assistant Professor of English at Pace University. In her research and teaching, she explores the role of media change past and present... Read More →


Friday October 5, 2018 6:15pm - 8:00pm
Terrace Room
 
Saturday, October 6
 

7:30am

Breakfast
Saturday October 6, 2018 7:30am - 9:00am
Terrace Room

7:30am

Registration
Registration will take place on the 2nd floor of the Elaine Langone Center (ELC) on the uphill side of the building. Please follow signs to registration posted in the ELC.

Saturday October 6, 2018 7:30am - 9:00am
Elaine Langone Center Hallway

9:00am

The Digital Humanities Summer Scholars Program and Multidisciplinary Humanities Research
This summer’s Lafayette College Digital Humanities Summer Scholars program saw topics ranging from travel narratives to Jerusalem in the Middle Ages to the diasporic writings of Vietnamese-American authors to a socioeconomic analysis of the New York City Metropolitan Authority’s public subway transportation system. Four out of the seven Summer Scholars —Uche Anomnachi, Norman Lee, Alex Murrell, and Angela Shi— will present their final digital research projects in varied forms.


Saturday October 6, 2018 9:00am - 10:30am
Room 241

9:00am

The Making of the History of Women in Science Project: A Student-Centered Approach to 3D Technology and Digital Scholarship
This presentation highlights student work on the History of Women in Science Project at Bryn Mawr College.The History of Women in Science (HoWiS) Project uses a variety of 3D technologies to recreate historical spaces where women practiced science. The virtual spaces serve as navigation to interactive pedagogical content contextualizing the experiences of women learning, teaching, and using scientific knowledge. Gender prejudices still adversely affect women’s success in STEM fields. A nuanced, public-facing exploration of the longer history of women’s practices can denaturalize negative stereotypes and encourage women to pursue scientific knowledge by demonstrating their persistent, sophisticated involvement in science throughout modern history. Student inquiry, professional development, and the scaffolding of integrated use of disciplinary skills shaped this project. The team will discuss their efforts to research, model, and animate circa 1900 laboratory spaces.


Saturday October 6, 2018 9:00am - 10:30am
Room 241

9:00am

Accessing Medieval Queer History through Digital Humanities
Scholars have written extensively on a diverse range of aspects concerning medieval literature and society. However, analysis of sexuality has only gained adequate attention since the 1990s and many questions still remain. In particular, how do we go about discussing and describing medieval same-sex relationships? Secondly, as researchers in the digital age, how do we communicate the results of our scholarly inquiry to a larger public? Although not discussed openly in medieval texts, evidence and source documents suggest that same-sex relationships still played a role in medieval society and one faces the challenge of presenting this topic to a larger audience. How do we use digital humanities methods to bring textual and codicological evidence of medieval sexuality to light? This short presentation aims to take a look at how digital tools such as AntConc and the IIIF can bring the reader into contact with the corpus in its visual context. More importantly, I explore how digital formats can enhance non-academic accessibility of medieval queer experience.


Saturday October 6, 2018 9:00am - 10:30am
Walls Lounge

9:00am

Running Wires: Digital History in the Classroom and the Field
In the summer of 2015, a team at Gettysburg College formed in order to tell the story of British officer H.J.C. “Jack” Peirs through the letters he wrote home during the First World War. For the last 3 years, our team, with the support of student assistants, has maintained a digital history project that publishes Jack’s letters 100 years to the day they were written. By telling the story of one person, we have helped to humanize a dehumanizing war and raised awareness of all who sacrificed during the Great War. While the project was conceived with pedagogy in mind, it has grown beyond the letters and crossed boundaries: from the analog to the digital, from the classroom to the public, and from the archives to the field. Isherwood, Lucadamo, and Miessler will discuss how the Peirs project has evolved, how it has engaged with the public, and plans for what comes after Armistice Day.​


Saturday October 6, 2018 9:00am - 10:30am
Walls Lounge

9:00am

The Spanish Civil War Memory Project: Creating Access to International Exchange


The Spanish Civil War Memory Project consists of over one hundred audiovisual testimonies of victims, militants, survivors, and witnesses of the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939) and Francoist repression (1939-1975). The testimonies were recorded by graduate student researchers between 2006 and 2010 as part of an initiative of UC San Diego in collaboration with several human rights associations in Spain. To make the archive that resulted from this collaboration a more user-friendly and media-rich experience, we are now in the process of training student researchers to digitally enhance the collected testimonies with the web-based system OHMS. In these efforts we aim to provide access to international exchange by pairing students in Spain with students in the United States to collaboratively research and bilingually index the collected testimonies.


Saturday October 6, 2018 9:00am - 10:30am
Walls Lounge

9:00am

Warts and All: Interrogating our Collections as Data
Treating collections as data in special collections libraries enables the utilization of new research methods and questions. It should also be an occasion to apply a critical lens to long-held practices in data collection and classification. This panel examines the choices made throughout these processes and addresses the following questions: What structures of power are being reinforced in our metadata? What decisions are rendered invisible when we create datasets? Who gets to describe whom, on whose authority, and in whose interest? What are the implications of employing out-of-domain ontologies and controlled vocabularies in our work?

Drawing from domain-specific processes in Library and Information Science, Digital Scholarship, and Assyriology. this panel discusses various strategies employed to mitigate the perpetuation of problematic metadata practices when treating collections as data.

Speakers

Saturday October 6, 2018 9:00am - 10:30am
Center Room

10:30am

Break
Saturday October 6, 2018 10:30am - 10:45am
Elaine Langone Center Hallway

10:45am

Creating large text datasets for humanities research using reproducible methods
In this interactive session, I will guide the audience through methods for preparing a large, uniform data set from the writings of Phillip K. Dick suitable for use in discovering the uses of language around gender within the corpus using algorithmic methods. I will be working with a variety of media for source material (scanned pages of manuscripts, printed books, PDF's, web-based text, etc) and will use the Python programming language along with various libraries to extract text, format the data and retain meta-data information required to reference the original sources. I will be able to document my work in a way that will allow future researchers to read and understand the nuances of my methodology with enough detail to recreate my dataset from the original sources (whether or not they appear in the same medium) using an entirely different programming language or suite of tools.

Speakers

Saturday October 6, 2018 10:45am - 12:15pm
Room 241

10:45am

Observing the Unobservable: Modeling the Natural World in Virtual Reality
Like many schools within the last few years, at Colby College, we have been experimenting with virtual reality in the classroom and have been impressed with its potential to create profoundly immersive virtual environments, both real and imagined. Recently, in addition to building virtual spaces, we have also been exploring more specific uses of this technology. Creating models to represent objects which are to be studied has always been an essential part of scholarly research in every discipline, and we have found that VR is a powerful tool for modeling relationships, interactions, and behaviors, in addition to spaces. This presentation will focus on three projects that take advantage of VR’s modeling potential to fashion classroom experiences which allow students to observe that which is otherwise unobservable to them in the natural world or, at least, unobservable in the way their instructors would like.


Saturday October 6, 2018 10:45am - 12:15pm
Walls Lounge

10:45am

We Built an App: Exploring New Assignments in a History Class
In the spring 2018 semester, seven students in History 419: Digital History and Archival Practices built Android apps as one of their assignments. The focus of the class is students creating projects using digital tools based on archival research in the St. Bonaventure University archives. It is team taught by Dennis Frank, University Archivist, and Phillip Payne, Department of History. Rachael Schultz, also of the archives, joined in helping the students. Her MLIS background proved valuable. Building an app was a new assignment for the class. The instructors wanted to explore the impact of mobile technology on digital history practices and make a legacy digital mapping and web page project into project mobile. Over several iterations of the class, we have built a digital map of a cemetery. The next logical step was to make the map mobile friendly. Additional goals included having students think broadly about mobile technology, design, and collaboration. We propose a session where students and instructors discuss their experience building their first app.


Saturday October 6, 2018 10:45am - 12:15pm
Walls Lounge

10:45am

A Critical Look at the Digital Scholarship Corpus: How Access Influences the Questions We (Can) Ask
Access to research materials is an issue that cuts across disciplines and impacts most researchers as they gather information. For a digital scholar in need of a textual corpus, however, these challenges may be particularly acute. Those studying mid-to-late 20th century works may find themselves in uncertain territory with regard to copyright and licensing. Those studying historically marginalized populations may have trouble finding a pre-compiled corpus, or finding texts at all. Researchers at smaller institutions or in underfunded departments may find that existing datasets are not available to them due to cost, or that they run into copyright and licensing barriers when attempting to compile a large corpus of texts. Even an existing or easily harvested corpus may present structural challenges for our tools. How do we diversify and democratize digital scholarship while also navigating the difficulties of equitable access to information?


Saturday October 6, 2018 10:45am - 12:15pm
Center Room

10:45am

Enhancing the discovery of distributed scholarly assets: an exploration of requirements
This presentation will present results of a National Endowment for the Humanities funded project, “Integrating Digital Humanities into the Web of Scholarship with SHARE”. Through a mixed methods approach comprised of a survey, workshop, and series of site visits to DH centers on US and Canadian campuses, the project team investigated how DH projects can be enhanced to make DH projects more findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable, or FAIR.


Saturday October 6, 2018 10:45am - 12:15pm
Center Room

10:45am

Increasing Diversity Representation in an Institutional Repository
Since its inception six years ago, our institutional repository has provided a number of opportunities to increase campus diversity awareness and representation. Examples begin with use as the registration/schedule platform for our annual Diversity Conference and as a repository for keynotes and other conference sessions. The repository also houses student journals such as 'Dissenting Voices', and we have built online exhibits related to artifacts from other parts of the world (e.g., New Guinea). A new e-book imprint has enabled us to publish books in Spanish and about other times and cultures, e.g., 'Gilgamesh'. The repository has allowed us to look back to local college history and acknowledge various diversity efforts over the years. The poster will include and invite additional creative ideas to foster and grow inclusion in digital scholarship efforts.


Saturday October 6, 2018 10:45am - 12:15pm
Center Room

12:15pm

Lunch & Keynote Address
Whitney is a distinguished user experience researcher. She has written three books on usability – Storytelling for User Experience: Crafting stories for better design (with Kevin Brooks), Global UX: Design and research in a connected world (with Daniel Szuc), and A Web for Everyone: Designing accessible user experiences (with Sarah Horton). She is also the director of the Usability in Civic Life project. More information about her current projects and experience can be found here.

Speakers
WQ

Whitney Quesenbery

Keynote Speaker at BUDSC18
Whitney is a distinguished user experience researcher. She has written three books on usability – Storytelling for User Experience: Crafting stories for better design (with Kevin Brooks), Global UX: Design and research in a connected world (with Daniel Szuc), and A Web for Everyone... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 12:15pm - 2:00pm
Terrace Room

2:00pm

Re: Centering the Digital Liberal Arts: How to Sustain Inclusion, Collaboration and Networks When Soft Money Hardens
In this interactive discussion we take stock of gains in cultivating collaborative curriculum, projects and networks in the Digital Liberal Arts. We cite our own experiences as a “center” located interstitially between library, academic departments, administration and IT; and, externally, hosting ILiADS (Institute for Liberal Arts Digital Scholarship), and working with others to establish on its basis a permanent networked organization. We look at collaborative structures at various levels of scale, from small project teams to multi-institutional alliances, to identify promising developments and diagnose persistent obstacles to sustainable collaboration.

Speakers
avatar for Jacob Heil

Jacob Heil

Digital Scholarship Librarian, Dir. of CoRE, College of Wooster
Jacob Heil is the College of Wooster's Digital Scholarship Librarian and the Director of its Collaborative Research Environment (CoRE). Partnering with library colleagues, faculty, and students, he explores digital methods and modalities for teaching and research. He also collaborates... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Room 241

2:00pm

Accessing Local History and Culture Through Wellness: The Ready Set Fit App
What do students learn when they engage in public-facing interdisciplinary digital research with tangible community-oriented outcomes? Using a case study of the Ready Set Fit smartphone app, we explore the deep learning that occurs when students engage in an ambitious software development and content-design project conducted outside usual course structures. Ready Set Fit, a student developed smartphone app, brings together wellness, place-based learning, and crowdsourced walking paths. Responding to an expressed need to motivate exercise among the “pre-sick,” the app guides and informs the user along a selected themed walking path, each of which contains a collection of significant locations. An integral part of this project has been to engage community partners to create paths that have cultural and historical significance for that area. Such collaboration with community partners demands new skills of students and faculty mentors alike as each partner has a unique set of values, objectives, and resources.


Saturday October 6, 2018 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Walls Lounge

2:00pm

Digital Pedagogy and Scholarship Training for Faculty in the Liberal Arts
In the spring of 2018, a team from the Office of Digital Pedagogy and Scholarship in the College of Liberal Arts at Penn State designed a digital pedagogy development program for faculty within the College of the Liberal Arts. The ultimate goal of this program sought to encourage faculty to include digital methods in their courses. The Blend Digital Liberal Arts (BlendDLA) program focused on incorporating digital competencies and practices into existing courses, as well as offering continued support through a course redesign program. Attendees had the opportunity to develop new ways to incorporate blended learning and digital methods into their existing courses and scholarship. After intensive discussion and collaboration, attendees implemented more robust and dynamic experiences for learners that take advantage of available technologies. This presentation will detail how a small team worked to build a community of digital pedagogical practice and share pedagogical models for future development.


Saturday October 6, 2018 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Room 241

2:00pm

Pollinator Panic!
Pollinator Panic! is an educational tool developed by undergraduate students in collaboration with the Center for Pollinator Research to communicate the complexity of bee community dynamics and promote awareness for bee conservation. The player acts as a field researcher who sets out to restore a damaged habitat using flora and bee species. By examining how these species interact to build a more stable community, the game illustrates research vital to the ecological health of pollinators.

This serious game project was developed to raise awareness about the importance of bee conservation and help teach concepts related to bee community dynamic to ENT 222 (Penn State University Park) and the general public.

Through gameplay- players encounter challenges relating to pollution, parasites, disease and bee nutrition, while attempting to restore a sample through the strategic addition of flora and fauna.


Saturday October 6, 2018 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Center Room

2:00pm

Sustainable Digital Scholarship Summer Programs through Consortial Collaboration
Digital scholarship and digital humanities summer programs are emerging throughout Pennsylvania and beyond, but access to materials and support networks for program organizers and students have been sparse. While each local instantiation is unique, program organizers and students benefit from formal opportunities to share best practices and receive feedback on their work. In 2018, the Pennsylvania Consortium for the Liberal Arts generously supported our efforts to bring together program organizers, from eight colleges and universities, for a series of meetings leading up to a summer symposium for undergraduate digital scholarship research. As part of our mission, we have worked to collect and provide access to planning materials for organizers and exemplary work for undergraduates conducting digital scholarship research. During this session, we will share findings and a first glimpse of the toolkit for supporting undergraduate digital scholarship and digital humanities programs.


Saturday October 6, 2018 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Room 241

2:00pm

Telling the Institution's Digital Stories: Communications, Student Partnerships, and (gulp) Marketing
How do students learn about and access digital programs? How do members of the public or college alumni learn that college initiatives exist? Digital programs need some sort of marketing to create these access points, but we rarely think about such marketing being in itself a pedagogical activity.

This presentation examines the communication plan for Bryn Mawr College's Digital Competencies, an initiative that seeks to help students gain the digital skills and critical perspectives on technology necessary to 21st-century leaders, and speculates on the ways that digital communications of digital programs can strive for access, inclusivity, and sound pedagogical practice. The presentation will share practical suggestions for reaching different audiences, best practices for working as clients with student experts, and will showcase examples of student-created marketing materials, including infographics, videos, data analysis, web design, and more.


Saturday October 6, 2018 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Center Room

3:30pm

Break
Saturday October 6, 2018 3:30pm - 3:45pm
Elaine Langone Center Hallway

3:45pm

Atlanta Housing Interplay: Reinventing the Digital Monograph
This panel will discuss Atlanta Housing Interplay, a new digital art history project in development at Emory University. The project, focused on the first public housing projects built in Atlanta in the 1930s, seeks to provide a model for a published, digital monograph. The talk will explain the origins of Atlanta Housing Interplay, its structure, and how it will bridge the gap between traditional print scholarship and interactive online projects. The panel will explore the issues of platform, publishing, and target audience and talk about striking a balance between academic research and public history.


Saturday October 6, 2018 3:45pm - 4:45pm
Walls Lounge

3:45pm

History, Poetry, and Place: Recovering the Lost Voices of the Eighth Ward
Digital scholarship has tremendous potential for public engagement when it forges connections to real communities and cultivates a broader culture of care. In this presentation, we discuss our efforts and success in generating care among both college students and Harrisburg residents by connecting the scholarship of the Digital Harrisburg Initiative to a public humanities program known as “Poetry in Place.” The work of the former has generated historical maps of the city in GIS and the names of thousands of individual citizens whose lives and residences were recorded in the US federal censuses, while the latter has used digital data as a starting point for workshops in which youth and adults voice their own perspectives of the city and its past through poetry. Our collaboration has connected our college students to real communities beyond data entry and GIS, and connected Harrisburg residents to a real local history through poems.


Saturday October 6, 2018 3:45pm - 4:45pm
Walls Lounge

3:45pm

Limits of Empathy: Puerto Rico and Lin-Manuel Miranda's Twitter Activism
This presentation analyzes Lin-Manuel Miranda’s strategies for mobilizing activism on Twitter by comparing his response to hurricane recovery efforts with that of protests in Puerto Rico. I begin the presentation by outlining the rhetorical strategies that Miranda typically uses to build affective alliances with his Twitter followers, for example, how he uses “you” to invoke his audience. I then review his response to hurricane Maria’s landfall in Puerto Rico, including the #AlmostLikePraying benefit song project. I move on to describe how Miranda distances himself from Puerto Rican protest movements, for example, those against austerity measures that took place on May 1, 2018. I argue that comparing Miranda’s responses to these different events points to the limits of cultivating empathy and intimacy on Twitter in order to mobilize activism. This presentation forms part of a larger research project on Latinx creative writers and their use of Twitter.


Saturday October 6, 2018 3:45pm - 4:45pm
Room 241

3:45pm

Recovering Women’s Literary History: The Aperio Project and the Women’s Literary Club of Baltimore
Dr. Jean Lee Cole’s Aperio project strives to recover the lives and literary voices of members of the Woman’s Literary Club of Baltimore (1890-1941). This presentation will detail the content and process of this ongoing project, from the transcription of Club documents to the questions of access and exclusion they raise to the digital tools used to display the wealth of information recovered thus far. The iterative process resembles an agile methodology, and it is possible that similar long term evolving digital scholarship projects can implement lessons learned from the software development community.


Saturday October 6, 2018 3:45pm - 4:45pm
Room 241

3:45pm

And there was DS for All: Extending Access Throughout the Library for a Sustainable Service Model
In order to create a sustainable service model for Digital Scholarship (DS), River Campus Libraries recognized the need to expand staff expertise and advocacy beyond the Digital Scholarship Lab (DSL). The challenge: Training everyone in a way that is both timely and fiscally responsible. The solution: Leveraging costly, intensive professional development opportunities to re-create a modified peer-to-peer learning experience. By increasing staff access to foundational DS theories, concepts, methodologies, and tools, libraries can foster a community of experts toward advocating for and working collaboratively to facilitate DS projects.

In this interactive workshop, presenters will share benefits resulting from collaborative professional development and guide audience members through an instructional design process by which to brainstorm their own in-house learning opportunities.

Institutional efforts can then lead to regional outreach where a train-the-trainer model can cause ripple effects to libraries unable to sponsor costly, intensive professional development opportunities focused on DS.


Saturday October 6, 2018 3:45pm - 4:45pm
Center Room

5:00pm

Cocktail Hour, Poster and Digital Demonstration Session
Digital Gamelan Learning
Abby Dolan (Bucknell University, '19)

I Can Hardly Believe the Changes 
Emma Lewis (Gettysburg College, '20)

Gettysburg College: A Diversity Story
Ivana Lopez Espinosa (Gettysburg College, '19)

Remembering Gettysburg: From Memorial to Stage 
Gauri Mangala (Gettysburg College, '21)

World War II, Art Deco and Culture
Nicholas Nam (Bucknell University, '19)

How Do We Fit In?
Augusta Pendergast (Gettysburg College, '19)

The Making of the History of Women in Science Project: A Student-Centered Approach to 3D Technology and Digital Scholarship
Dr. Jessica Linker  (Bryn Mawr College)  

Running Wires: Digital History in the Classroom and the Field
R.C. Meissler (Gettysburg College)

Pollinator Panic!
Carlos Rosas (School of Visual Arts, Penn State University)

Digital Pedagogy and Scholarship Training for Faculty in the Liberal Arts
Aaron Mauro (Penn State University)

History, Heritage, & Hope: A Virtual Exhibit 
Barb Lewis (USF Libraries)

Accessing Local History and Culture Through Wellness: The Ready Set Fit App  
Stu Thompson (Bucknell University)

Using Digital Scholarship and Citizen Science to Reduce Lead Poisoning Risk in Indiana 
Matthew Sisk (University of Notre Dame)

Increasing Diversity Representation in an Institutional Repository 
Mary Jo Orzech (The College at Brockport)

The Grupo De Apoyo Mutuo Digital Archive: Historical Memory and Researching Guatemala’s Disappeared 
Alex Galarza (Haverford College)

"CommonPlace": A Signage-Based Digital Publication for Collaborative Scholarship 
Christopher Gilman, Jacob Alden Sargent (Occidental College)

Representation of Mental Disorders in American Films 
Craig Terry (Bucknell University '21)


Saturday October 6, 2018 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Terrace Room

6:00pm

Dinner in Lewisburg
If you are interested in meeting with others for dinner on Saturday evening after the Digital Poster and Demo Session, meet in the Center Room in the Elaine Langone Center at 6:00. There will be a Bucknell staff member available to guide you.

Saturday October 6, 2018 6:00pm - 8:00pm
Center Room
 
Sunday, October 7
 

7:30am

Breakfast
Sunday October 7, 2018 7:30am - 8:30am
Terrace Room

8:30am

History, Heritage, & Hope: A Virtual Exhibit
Florida law requires “all school districts to incorporate lessons on the Holocaust.” In support of this law, The Florida Holocaust Museum provides tours and educational resources to schools around the state and the country. However, The Museum exhibitions are only accessible to those who can travel to St. Petersburg, FL.

In 2016, The Florida Holocaust Museum and the University of South Florida's Tampa Library and Department of History collaborated on the creation of a virtual exhibit of the Museum's permanent 1st floor exhibit. The goal of the project was to bring the historical and educational resources and the visual experience of the exhibit to a wider audience and to preserve the content of the exhibit. In this presentation, the project plan and collaborative process will be reviewed, Phase 1 of the exhibit will be demo’d, and future plans for the exhibit will be discussed.


Sunday October 7, 2018 8:30am - 10:00am
Center Room

8:30am

Library Supported Scholarship: Increasing Faculty Scholarly Reach with Author Services
The departments of institutional research & training and the library and learning center at Goldey-Beacom College, a small private doctoral-granting institution, partnered to offer training workshops and professional development opportunities to faculty related to research and publication processes. We recently surveyed current faculty regarding their satisfaction, level of awareness, and desire for training regarding library and researcher services using Qualtrics. This presentation will share results from this survey and lessons learned from offering a workshop about how researchers can expand their online presence using author profiles.


Sunday October 7, 2018 8:30am - 10:00am
Center Room

8:30am

Little Manila Recreated
The University of the Pacific’s Digital Delta Project, in collaboration with the Filipino-American National Historical Society, and Little Manila Rising, and supported by a California Humanities, Humanities for All Grant, created a virtual reality museum exhibit that digitally reconstructs the Little Manila neighborhood in Stockton and interprets its significance as a center of regional and national Filipino-American culture. Little Manila Recreated brings to life the history of this neighborhood, once the largest concentration of Filipinos outside of the Philippines, and explores its destruction through urban redevelopment. The exhibit/game places players in the shoes of mid-twentieth century Filipino immigrants who forged a vibrant ethnic enclave in the face of discrimination and oppressive working conditions, to historicize the effects of immigration policies and city planning decisions on community cohesion. Curriculum development and teacher outreach encourages use of the game in conjunction with the Common Core California History curriculum.


Sunday October 7, 2018 8:30am - 10:00am
Walls Lounge

8:30am

Making an Impact: Digital Proficiency at Messiah College
Join us for a lively, interactive discussion focused on a digital learning initiative. Presenters will share details about the new digital proficiency initiative at Messiah College, which offers programming for faculty, students and staff to enhance digital skills.

The result of a generous grant, the initiative is a 3-year program that seeks to answer some of these questions. Presenters will share our experiences so far in development and initial roll out of this initiative and our future plans. And we'd like to hear from you. Whether you are just beginning this journey, well ahead of us in the adventure, or somewhere in between, we can all learn from each other. This presentation is designed to be an interactive experience; audience participation is encouraged.


Sunday October 7, 2018 8:30am - 10:00am
Room 241

8:30am

Redefining Difficult: A Post-Bac's Perspective on the Accessibility of Digital Scholarship Practices for Recent Grads
What does a post-bac in digital scholarship do? This talk will give participants an idea of the type of work a post-bac can be expected to undertake, as well as a perspective on the types of challenges a non-computer science student may face when first getting into the field. Aimed at anyone who is interested in developing student or post-bac positions, this talk takes a critical lens to the practice of teaching oneself and the imperative to “make” digital scholarship. It asks, “what does it mean to make digital scholarship open and accessible outside of the academy or to non-experts?” and resists simple or quick fixes.


Sunday October 7, 2018 8:30am - 10:00am
Room 241

8:30am

The Grupo De Apoyo Mutuo Digital Archive: Historical Memory and Researching Guatemala’s Disappeared
The Grupo de Apoyo Mutuo (GAM) Digital Archive is collaborative, post-custodial digitization project that aims to preserve and provide access to materials held by Guatemala’s oldest human rights organization. The GAM’s archive contains a unique set of textual and audiovisual materials of significance to ongoing human rights trials and Guatemala’s historical memory. This project demo focuses on the recently-launched digital archive which features GAM’s collection of testimony and documentation on over 3,700 cases of forced disappearance Guatemala’s armed internal conflict. Built with Django, the archive’s features include transcriptions; metadata; search; and case summaries. The project demo will focus on how the partnership between Haverford College Libraries staff and undergraduates and GAM staff informed key design decisions, particularly on ethics and privacy. Participants will also utilize the digital archive in a series of exercises designed to show its potential for researchers, legal experts, and a broad public.


Sunday October 7, 2018 8:30am - 10:00am
Walls Lounge

10:00am

Break
Sunday October 7, 2018 10:00am - 10:15am
Elaine Langone Center Hallway

10:15am

Addressing the Access Gap in the Digital Archive: Progress through Partnerships
In a 2016 American Periodicals forum on “Digital Approaches to Periodical Studies,” Ryan Cordell remarks that “access to digital periodical archives is unevenly distributed, with the largest collections sold by commercial providers beyond the means of smaller institutions and independent scholars.“ The access gap is not limited just to “haves” and “have nots,” but also appears in gradated levels of access. How, then, to work towards levelling the academic playing field in terms of database access in an economic environment in which fewer institutions can afford top-level access to them? In my talk I will offer a modest proposal: I will suggest expanding partnerships between three parties: 1) archival libraries, 2) the commercial database providers who digitize and offer their holdings in databases, and 3) individual researchers who do not otherwise have full access to either the archives or the databases.


Sunday October 7, 2018 10:15am - 11:45am
Walls Lounge

10:15am

Archiving the Stories of the 2018 West Virginia Teachers’ Strike
Earlier this year, teachers and school personnel across West Virginia went on strike, shutting down schools in all 55 of the state’s counties. As the school year ended, teachers began to reflect on their experiences, and many expressed the desire to have their stories recorded. To answer this need, an interdisciplinary group at West Virginia University developed a digital exhibit that provides the strike’s participants with a platform where they can share their stories by contributing photos, videos, oral recordings, social media exchanges, and written accounts of the events. This exhibit provides both researchers and the public with access to stories at the center of the strike that may not have otherwise been heard. In order to ensure that teachers’ accounts are accessible to future generations, materials from the digital exhibit are being archived in the West Virginia & Regional History Center at the WVU Libraries.


Sunday October 7, 2018 10:15am - 11:45am
Room 241

10:15am

Finding Your Roots: Understanding America’s Immigrant History Through Genealogy
In response to increasing nativist sentiments in the US, we are teaching a first-year seminar this fall where students will explore their family’s history, with the goal of helping them discover their immigrant origins. Inspired by the PBS program “Finding Your Roots”, students will gain an understanding of what’s involved in genealogical research and how that can tie into events in American and world history. But rather than rely on professional genealogists, the students themselves will learn archival research techniques, using online sources for census data, periodicals, passenger lists, etc. They will compile this information into a free database program, to allow charting of their family tree and mapping of their travels, and optionally share it with others through online networks. They will also research contemporaneous events to provide historical context for their family’s story. A discussion of genetics and optional DNA analysis will round out the course content.


Sunday October 7, 2018 10:15am - 11:45am
Walls Lounge

10:15am

Graphicacy: How fluency in reading and making visualizations can yield more inclusive reading experiences
Scholars and students practice literacy, numeracy, and graphicacy in school. In this educational triumvirate, graphicacy remains the less familiar term. Graphicacy is an ability, a fluency in making and reading visualizations and charts. How might scholars working in digital media practice graphic literacy in the shaping and sharing of their work? By working with more awareness of graphic literacy, scholars can also become more inclusive. In this illustrated essay, I will describe how my work in visualizing survey data provides insight into graphic literacy. Survey data is a primary data source. These observations have the potential for meaning yet need a meaningful structure and shape. While structuring, exploring, and visualizing this survey data, diverse world views begin to emerge. Digital scholars can also identify when to draw upon data-driven or conceptual content. By creating interactive survey data visualizations, we can partake in more inclusive humanistic inquiries and reading experiences.


Sunday October 7, 2018 10:15am - 11:45am
Room 241

10:15am

Using Digital Scholarship and Citizen Science to Reduce Lead Poisoning Risk in Indiana
Lead exposure remains a prevalent public health issue in many communities. In some cases, the exposure risk comes from contaminated water, but in others it is from the legacy of lead-based paint or contaminated soils. Here, we report on recent work using digital scholarship techniques along side a citizen science model to increase awareness and reduce environmental hazards in the affected city of South Bend, Indiana. Over the past two years, we have worked closely with local community organizations, civic entities and concerned individuals to develop a home test kit that puts the tools to determine risk in the hands of residents. We have also used digital scholarship techniques (mobile data collection apps, interactive dashboards and story maps) to involve the community and start advocating for change surrounding this issue.


Sunday October 7, 2018 10:15am - 11:45am
Walls Lounge

10:15am

Wide Open Spaces: Evaluating Digital Humanities and Access in Rural Communities
In the summer of 2018, I began “The Music that Built the West,” a digital project focused on uncovering musical narratives of marginalized populations on the American Frontier and sharing those narratives with a frontier audience using digital technologies. In this presentation, I will use the “Music that Built the West” as a case study to examine how digital humanists can design their projects to alleviate the unique challenges faced by rural communities: specifically, physical distance to archival resources and cognitive distance from the subject matter. The presentation will evaluate how these challenges are addressed through digital tools including the curation of a digital exhibit featuring historically informed fictionalized musical narratives (presented using Arc GIS Story Maps), an archive of musical artifacts and stories from the Frontier, operation of several social media accounts, and the creation of digitally available lesson plans for K-12 educators.


Sunday October 7, 2018 10:15am - 11:45am
Room 241

11:45am

Snacks
Sunday October 7, 2018 11:45am - 12:00pm
Elaine Langone Center Hallway